McMaster University

McMaster University

Annual DAY in FACULTY DEVELOPMENT

2017

2017 — SAVE THE DATE !

10th Annual DAY in FACULTY DEVELOPMENT

Wednesday, May 10, 2017
12:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. (approx.)

David Braley Health Sciences Centre (2nd Floor), 100 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON

Join us as we celebrate our 30th year !!


Schedule for 10th Annual DAY in FACULTY DEVELOPMENT
PDF

Call for Submissions (for Interprofessional Innovations Fair/Facilitated Poster Presentation/Creative Exhibit)PDF
Individuals interested in participating with either a non-facilitated poster/display; facilitated poster presentation (electronic), or facilitated creative exhibit (art; photography; music and/or narrative, etc., please complete and submit form above by:
April 3, 2017. (NOTE: extended to April 19, 2017)

This year's event is designed as a forum for all health professionals/educators to showcase their teaching innovations and network with fellow colleagues in the ‘Spirit of Community & Scholarship’. This year's theme is
"Arts & Humanities in the Health Professions".

The day is comprised of an Inter-professional Innovations Fair from 12:00 to 12:30 p.m. (approx.), Facilitated poster presentations/Facilitated Creative Exhibits from 12:30 to 1:55 p.m. in 2nd Floor area, David Braley Health Sciences Centre, with poster displays and demonstrations on innovative educational tools and strategies, as well as art; photography; music; narrative submissions; Short Sessions from 2:00-3:55 p.m., concluding with the
Henry & Sylvia WONG Forum in Medicine 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. (approx.) with Reception following.


Henry & Sylvia WONG Forum in Medicine
-  4:15 to 5:30 p.m. (approx.)

Cat's Cradle and the Clinical Trial: The Humanity of Medicine and the Humanities in Medicine

Talk abstract: We are experiencing an existential crisis in medicine. A crisis of meaning manifests as physician discomfort with evidence-based medicine, caregiver burnout, and clinician ambivalence over empathy for the patient and the self.  In this talk, we return to the social and historical origins of medicine to make visible three truths about the metaphysics of healing and the relationship of the physician to society.  A clue is to be found in the history of EBM at McMaster University and the work of David Sackett, who drew ideas from the novel Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut.  Medicine touches the foundation of the human; the humanities offer a way of returning to this basic reality, of seeing ourselves and the meaning of our medical practice.

Guest Speaker:
Dr. Ellen Amster photo
Dr. Ellen Amster
Jason A. Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine
Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics
Department of History, McMaster University


Highlights from our 30th Anniversary - 10th Annual DAY in FACULTY DEVELOPMENT -

Narrative Healthcare: Developing Narrative Competency for Healthcare Professionals - 2:00 to 3:55 p.m.)

Dr. Joyce Zazulak,                           
M.Sc, MD, CCFP, FCFP                 
photo of Joyce Zazulak                     
As Faculty, we are called upon more and more to use narrative approaches and reflective writing in our teaching. The use of narrative medicine and reflective writing has found its way into many healthcare curricula as an important tool to enhance self awareness and reflective capacity. This workshop will explore how developing skills in narrative competence in the clinical setting can increase our effectiveness as both clinicians and educators.

Art of Seeing - 2:00 to 3:55 p.m.
Ms. Nicole Knibb,                              Ms. Caitlin O'Connell,
Hons. BA, Art History, MDes   and        MScBMC

photo of Nicole Knibb                      photo of Caitlin O'Connell
Introduction to the Art of Seeing; facilitated formal analysis and interpretation with two works of art; Introduction to graphic medicine and storyboarding as narrative; Zine making hands-on activity; participant discussion about the experience sharing their story in a visual way; questions and wider discussion.

Facilitated Poster Sessions

It's Not The Form, It's The Process
    Past research has demonstrated the positive effects of visual and performing arts on health professionals' observational acuity and associated diagnostic skills, well-being and professional identity. However, the use of arts for the development of interpersonal skills has been relatively understudied. In partnership with a community print and media arts organization, Centre[3], we used a phenomenological approach to explore front-line mental health and social service workers' experiences with a creative professional development workshop based on the visual and performing arts. Pre- and post-workshop interviews with participants and post-workshop interviews with their managers revealed that the workshops were successful in enhancing teamwork skills and showed promise in the development of communication skills, though observable changes in workplace communication could not be confirmed. Our results demonstrate that participation in an creative, arts-based professional development workshop can lead to perceived improvements in interpersonal skills such as teamwork and communication among health professionals.

    Anita Acai, MSc; Sydney A McQueen, MSc; Christine Fahim, MSc; Natalie Wagner, BSc; Victoria McKinnon, MSt BASc Jody Boston, BA

An Assessment for Surgical Specialty Candidate Readiness
    Background: This study aims to assess the efficacy of two workshops in improving student readiness for the CaRMS application. Methods: Two workshops were developed; the first targeted the written application, with advice offered by program directors (PDs), and the second, residency interviews, with advice from surgical residents. Pre- and post- surveys were conducted. Results: 35 students attended; 34% listed general surgery as their primary specialty of interest, 23% urology, and the remainder, other surgical specialties. Only 13% of students believed that existing resources were sufficient. 93% of attendees reported that they would find an information session from PDs beneficial for completing the CaRMS application, and one-on-one MMI-style interview practice beneficial for residency interviews. Post- workshop, most students agreed that the information was indeed beneficial (97% and 83% respectively), and that the workshops should be annual. Conclusions: Our study contributes to the limited literature on student resources for the CaRMS application and interview preparation.

    Pinkal Patel; Ada Gu; Savannah Silva

Poetry in Medicine

    Hospital Café

    (Barton Bean)

    Michael Stacey

     

    An ordinary coffee shop

                    unlike any other

    house blend, Starbucks,

    flavour, latte

    focal point for emotion

                    expressed not vented

    constrained above its occupants

                    feelings float

                    never intersecting

     

    Family on break

                    from vigil in ICU

                    expressions of confusion

    patient fresh from clinic

                    relief near smile

                    uncertain fate averted

    medical student

                    first time on the wards

                    confidence belies incertitude

    admin staff balancing

                    limited beds, resources

                    with stress on families

    team of surgeons

                    laugh and joke

                    make light of gravitas

     

    Each group isolated

                    within their own concerns

    remain apart

                    together in this room

    a place for meeting

                    not for discussion

    where concern paces silently

                    around but not between

    house blend, Starbucks,

    flavour, latte



    Dr Michael Stacey - MBBS, DS, FRACS Professor, McMaster University Surgeon in Chief, Hamilton Health Science

Music Therapy
    Music therapists use the process of improvising music, engaging in pre-composed music, collaborative song writing, lyric analysis and listening, to meet health care goals. Music therapists work with all ages and diagnosis, such as autism, dementia, depression, anxiety, acquired brain injury and palliative care. Music is able to access abilities despite a diagnosis, to facilitate reaching health care goals such as speech, communication, range of motion, pain management, self-expression and social skills. Rachael has been working as an accredited music therapist since 2001, and teaching music therapy courses at McMaster University since 2010. In her presentation, she will present examples of music therapy interventions in action and the impact of these interventions on reaching health care goals.

    Rachael Finnerty RP MTA MMT MA

The Need for Innovative Approaches to Person and Family-Centered Care
    Beyond management of pain and symptoms, Hospice Palliative Care recognizes the psychosocial implications of a life-limiting illness, namely, that grieving can begin at time of diagnosis. Comprehensive psychosocial support for individuals and families is essential and should be implemented at any stage of illness. As a Palliative Social Worker, after learning of an innovative, inclusive and cost-effective intervention to support families facing a life-limiting illness, I began implementing this family-centred approach to care. The intervention included people of all ages and focused on supporting the individual and family. Regardless of the make up of their family - large or small - we meet together and explore the impact of the illness while also creating a legacy project. That Project? While the results have been profound, the activity is, quite simply, creating a “Hug”, a creative legacy project that can be done by anyone, anywhere, at any time.

    C. Elizabeth Dougherty, B.S.W, M.S.W, R.S.W Assistant Clinical Professor (Adjunct). Division of Palliative Care

Picturing Wellness
    In 2016, a partnership was established among McMaster Museum of Art, the Department of Pediatrics Child Advocacy and Assessment Program, as well as other medical faculty, students participating in a arts- and case-based child maltreatment course, and the research from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research team in boys’ and men’s health on sexual violence, gender, health and resilience (Wekerle, lead). Picturing Wellness was a two-part exhibit, the first comprised of faculty selecting from the Museum’s holdings, and a medical undergraduate student-developed video/performance art (shown here). The student and group-based evaluations showed positive learning pre- and post- engagement in involvement in the process of arriving at a Picturing Wellness exhibit. The value of the art approach is advanced as well-suited to child maltreatment, trauma, and resilience given the often subtle details indicating a suspicion of abuse/neglect, the tolerance for ambiguity and systematic search in clinical presentations. Further, the art approach minimizes the professional “gaze aversion” for the challenging confrontation with inflicted injury, hypothesized to underlie the relative under-reporting by healthcare professionals (as compared to education and police). A discovery-oriented, expert supported, and self-paced learning environment is consistent with trauma-informed principles of safety, autonomy, and emotional support.

    Christine Wekerle, Ph.D., & Craig Kung, M.D.

The Need for Innovative Approaches to Person and Family-Centered Care
    Beyond management of pain and symptoms, Hospice Palliative Care recognizes the psychosocial implications of a life-limiting illness, namely, that grieving can begin at time of diagnosis. Comprehensive psychosocial support for individuals and families is essential and should be implemented at any stage of illness. As a Palliative Social Worker, after learning of an innovative, inclusive and cost-effective intervention to support families facing a life-limiting illness, I began implementing this family-centred approach to care. The intervention included people of all ages and focused on supporting the individual and family. Regardless of the make up of their family - large or small - we meet together and explore the impact of the illness while also creating a legacy project. That Project? While the results have been profound, the activity is, quite simply, creating a “Hug”, a creative legacy project that can be done by anyone, anywhere, at any time.

    C. Elizabeth Dougherty, B.S.W, M.S.W, R.S.W Assistant Clinical Professor (Adjunct). Division of Palliative Care

Developing Resilience in Faculty Through Innovative Education in Mindfulness
    Given the pressures that exist in our health care system, health care professionals often are under significant stress to provide both quality clinical care to patients and quality teaching to their learners We present an innovative program to develop faculty and health professional skills in reflective practice and resilience, which strengthen participants’ ability to act as effective clinicians, educators, role models, and leaders. The basis of the curriculum rests in the neuroscience of mindfulness and its applications. This program was enabled through a unique partnership between acute care hospitals (HHS and SJHH), Family Health Teams (McMFHT and HFHT) and the McMaster Faculty of Health Sciences Program for Faculty Development (PFD), with additional funding support in 2013 from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care (MOH-LTC). Data from 2013 course participants (validated measurement tools and qualitative feedback) was analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of this initiative.

    Andrew Frolic, Ph.D., Kenneth Burgess, M.D., Savinna Frederiksen, Elaine Principi, Valerie Spironello, Alan Taniguchi & Craig Kung, M.D.

Brokeness Connects
    This was a photo taken in May 2011 in Cap-Haitien, a city on the North coast of Haiti, during my visit 16 months following the 7.0Mw earthquake that struck Haiti where an estimated 3 million people were affected by the quake. As a clinician working mostly with people who were affected by traumatic experiences, I experienced resonance as I witnessed how Haitians saw hope in the mist of what appeared to be less than nothingness. Four Haitian men, submerged and surrounded by what most perceived as undesirable, are focused, connected, and with explicit diligence searching for worth and value that is unseen. I was humbled and renewed by Haitians' healing faith. When aloneness is undone, the previously perceived as impossible becomes bearable.

    Sandy Yuen

Competency Based Medical Education
    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is an outcomes-based approach to the design, implementation, assessment, and evaluation of a medical education program using an organizing framework of competencies (e.g. CanMeds 2015; http://www.royalcollege.ca/rcsite/canmeds/canmeds-framework). In a CBME system, a curriculum is organized around the outcomes expected of a resident and that resident's advancement is dependent on having achieved those expected outcomes. Competence by Design (CBD) is the Royal College's version of CBME. It is a transformational change initiative designed to enhance CBME in residency training and specialty practice in Canada.

    Dr. Moyez Ladhani, M.D. & Sharon Cameron

 


                       David Braley Health Sciences Centre (2nd Floor, Room 2032) — reception to follow
                                           100 Main Street West (corner of Bay), Hamilton, ON


 


 

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Level Double-A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0