McMaster University

McMaster University

Surgical Versus Non-surgical Interventions for Treating Patellar Dislocation

We are pleased to share with you a recent publication in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. This publication is entitled "Cochrane in CORRĀ®: Surgical Versus Non-surgical Interventions for Treating Patellar Dislocation (Review)".

Please find access to the full-version of the article click here.

Khan M and Miller BS. Cochrane in CORRĀ®: Surgical Versus Non-surgical Interventions for Treating Patellar Dislocation (Review). Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2016 Aug 9. DOI 10.1007/s11999-016-5014-x

Abstract

Acute patellar dislocations account for 2% to 3% of all knee injuries and have an estimated incidence of 5.8 per 100,000 patients per year. Patellar dislocations commonly result in injuries to the soft-tissue structures on the medial aspect of the knee, particularly the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which can predispose patients to recurrent instability. Patellar dislocations primarily affect young, physically active individuals, and recurrent instability can cause substantial morbidity. Repetitive injury can lead to pain, inability to return to sports, decreased quality-of-life, early degenerative changes, and osteoarthritis.

The ideal treatment for primary patellar dislocations is controversial. Primary patellar dislocations generally are treated nonoperatively with physical therapy and/or bracing, but redislocation occurs in 15% to 44% of patients treated with nonoperative management. Therefore, several studies have compared clinical outcomes between surgical and nonsurgical treatment options. Rigorous assessment of available evidence can inform clinicians regarding ideal treatment options for patients. This systematic review and meta-analysis presented findings on all randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (n = five trials; 344 patients) of surgical versus nonsurgical management for patients with primary lateral patellar dislocations.

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