System-Linked Research Unit Home Page
 
System-Linked Research Unit on Health and Social Service Utilization
Contact Us Site Map Help Message from the Director
From Gina Browne
Strategic Alliances
Key Findings
Impact
Working Papers
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
Reports
Publications
 
 
Research Transfer > System-Linked Research Unit Working Paper Series #96-05
   

96-05

System-Linked Research Unit
Working Paper Series #96-05

THE EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY OF CULTURAL SENSITIVE TRAINING FOR PROVIDERS OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES, ON PROVIDER ATTITUDES, CLIENT USE OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES AND THEIR HEALTH OUTCOMES "PART 1 of 111"

B. Majumdar, G. Browne, J. Roberts, M. Malean, B. Carpio

Objectives
Prejudice, with its inherent stereotyping and discriminating practises, may contribute to poor health, poor health care and ultimately greater expense for multicultural societies with national systems of health insurance. This randomized controlled trial, along with a qualitative component, tests the effects of cultural sensitive training for health care providers. There is no such rigorous evidence in the published literature on the value of culture sensitive training.

Method
Seventy-six health care providers and 47 clients (from two community agencies and one hospital) were randomly assigned to control or cultural sensitive training and followed over a two year period. Providers completed the Majumdar et al. (1992) Cultural Awareness Questionnaire, and the Rokeach (1960) Dogmatism Scale. Clients completed the Fillenbaum (1988) OAR-Multidimensional Measure of Functional Capacity, the Laisen et al. (1981) Client Satisfaction Questionnaire, the Majumdar (1993) Physical and Mental Health Assessment Questionnaire and the Browne (1990) Health and Social Utilization Questionnaire. In qualitative analysis incorporated the development of themes from journals of nurses who took part in the study.

Results
Culture sensitive training resulted in increased provider open-mindedness and cultural awareness and improved understanding of multiculturalism. More specifically, training resulted in the providers, who were predominantly mainstream, having greater insight and ability to communicate with minority persons. Clients, representing mostly European and British origins. Who received care from providers trained in culture sensitivity, demonstrated 1 years later, a greater level of social resources and improvement in overall functional capacity. These findings document the tangible health effects for mainstream and minority clients which result from cultural sensitive training for providers. Failure to fund these multicultural initiatives may result in poorer provider-client communication, poorer client function and subsequently greater expense Back to Topfor societies with systems of National Health Insurance.

Previous Abstract Next Abstract
 
   
Home The Unit Current Projects Research Transfer Resources News Feedback Community-Linked Evaluation AIDS Resource
Back to Top Copyright and Disclaimer